Intrinsic Value

  • 03 Jan
    Value Or Growth? Why Not Both

    Value Or Growth? Why Not Both

    • Many separate value and growth investing, but they are joined at the hip.
    • Growth creates value, but it can also destroy value.
    • Today, we’ll discuss how to apply growth when calculating the intrinsic value of a stock.



    Introduction

    There’s a lot of talk about the difference between growth and value investing. Even I’ve compared the two investing styles when discussing academic research on the subject showing how value stocks usually outperform growth stocks. Nevertheless, academic studies always talk in general and intelligent investors can be much more sophisticated than academics. More →

  • 25 Oct
    How To Calculate Intrinsic Value & Why You Need To

    How To Calculate Intrinsic Value & Why You Need To

    • Calculating the intrinsic value of a stock is essential for making any kind of buy or sell decision.
    • However, intrinsic value is different for everyone and depends on what you expect from the market.
    • Attaching a margin of safety to intrinsic value is all you need for low risk high return investments.



    Introduction

    99% of the what’s discussed about stocks is whether a stock is undervalued or overvalued and where will it go as you wouldn’t be a proper analyst without a price target on every stock you discuss.

    This is completely the wrong way to approach investing, but we as analysts will continue to deliver what the market wants. More →

  • 24 Mar
    Using Intrinsic Value To Measure Portfolio Performance

    Using Intrinsic Value To Measure Portfolio Performance

    • The market is irrational and can’t be used as the only measure of investment performance.
    • Imagine if all the businesses you own suddenly delisted, you’d look at their value in a different way.
    • Intrinsic value is based on the business owner perspective which is essential for reaching healthy long term returns.

    Introduction

    This past Tuesday was a bad day for stocks with both the Dow and the S&P 500 falling more than 1%. This isn’t very significant for now, apart from the fact that it broke the longest run the S&P 500 has ever seen without a 1% decline (64 days in comparison to 34 days in August 1995). However, it’s an excellent introduction to today’s topic on how we measure investment performance. More →

Search