Technology

  • 03 Dec
    ATVI’s -41% slump might be a good thing – but it probably isn’t over yet

    ATVI’s -41% slump might be a good thing – but it probably isn’t over yet

    One of the challenges associated with mature bull markets is the fact that they generally reflect a healthy overall economic backdrop. Why is that a challenge? Because when investors begin to recognize the fact that the economy has been healthy for a long time, the natural next question starts become how much longer it can last. Since the stock market is an emotional animal, uncertainty about the economy’s ability to keep chugging along with healthy growth numbers usually results in exactly what we have been seeing throughout practically the entire year: increased volatility that makes it harder for the market to sustain long-term trends.

    The fact is that no matter what alarmists might say or have you believe right now, the market isn’t definitively bearish right now. After reaching a new high in the beginning of October, the market dropped roughly 10% for the second time this year. A second legitimate correction in a year is a noteworthy event, since before this year, the market had managed to avoid any kind of drawdown of more than about 5% since late 2015 – and even that correction lasted only a few months before resuming the market’s longer upward trend. Until the market breaks down below its most immediately support around its February 2018 lows, however, it’s difficult to really start beating the bearish drum very hard.

    One of the sectors that has been beat down the most over the last couple of months is technology; and while the market seems to focus on hardware-driven industries, like networking and semiconductors, another segment that has seen its share of volatility is software – more specifically, software gaming companies. This is a segment that I think the market has always treated as being highly cyclical and sensitive to broad economic pressures. That makes sense up to a point, since video games and gaming consoles have historically proven to be something of a luxury item, where sales growth is easier to achieve when economic activity like job creation and wages are increasing. I’m starting to think, however that a generational shift could make this segment less sensitive than it has been – and that means that this is a market segment that could continue to perform well even if the broader economy does actually begin to slow down.



    Gaming has been around for a long time, of course, so the generational shift I’m talking about isn’t necessarily to suggest that there are going to be more gamers than their have been; in fact, there are a number of industry metrics that indicate total users could be leveling off or, in some cases even declining. The shift I think is occurring comes in the way gaming is treated as a regular activity in households.

    I’ll use my family as an example. I grew up in the early decades of video games; I can remember when Pong was a big deal, and I blew major chunks of my allowance and lawn-mowing money at the arcade on Space Invaders, Pac-Man, and about a dozen other games from that age. Gaming consoles like Atari and Nintendo quickly found a place in my home, and I was as enthusiastic about my video games as anybody. When I started my own family, I still played video games, but the demands of providing for my family, along with the other demands of life meant that gaming became nothing more than an occasional diversion for me.

    For my sons, however, gaming is a completely different story. Now in college, and working to build their own careers and lives, it’s been interesting to see how they make time to include gaming in their daily lives. Where my wife and I budget for things like dinner and a movie date nights, they budget for monthly subscriptions to their favorite games and gaming platforms, including paid updates. My sons represent the demographic that gaming companies like Activision Blizzard (ATVI), Take Two Interactive (TTWO) and Electronic Arts (EA) have been focusing their attention on for years; instead of simply trying to produce another cool game each year to generate a new batch of sales, these companies have transformed their development activities and business models to emphasize a continuous relationship with their customers, with revenue opportunities from monthly subscriptions that provide automatic updates and early release access to in-game purchase options for modules that provide specific, specialized gaming functions and features.



    My boys eat those things up, and they aren’t the only ones; it’s something that I’ve noticed really appeals to the Millennial generation. I think that means that gaming is becoming more and more a fundamental part of the economic landscape, because even if the economy does turn bearish, Millennials are going to find ways to make allowances for their games in their regular budgets. It means that while they may not become the same kind of defensive profile that I would put utilities or food and beverage companies into, I think that when the market does finally turn bearish, and even when the economy turns recessionary, gaming companies will maintain their fundamental strength far better than many analysts and experts think.

    ATVI is one of the stocks in the gaming industry that I think really bears paying attention to. If you’re familiar with games like Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, Skylanders, or even Candy Crush, then you’re familiar with this company’s work. The stock hit an all-time high at the beginning of October at nearly $85 per share, but has dropped more than 41% since then. I’m not sure the drop is over yet, and in fact I’m still not sure the stock is a great value yet, even with the stock down as big as it is. Its fundamentals, however are solid, and its value proposition is getting more and more interesting practically every day.



    Fundamental and Value Profile

    Activision Blizzard, Inc. is a developer and publisher of interactive entertainment content and services. The Company develops and distributes content and services across various gaming platforms, including video game consoles, personal computers (PC) and mobile devices. Its segments include Activision Publishing, Inc. (Activision), Blizzard Entertainment, Inc. (Blizzard), King Digital Entertainment (King) and Other. Activision is a developer and publisher of interactive software products and content. Blizzard is engaged in developing and publishing of interactive software products and entertainment content, particularly in PC gaming. King is a mobile entertainment company. It is engaged in other businesses, including The Major League Gaming (MLG) business; The Activision Blizzard Studios (Studios) business, and The Activision Blizzard Distribution (Distribution) business. It also develops products spanning other genres, including action/adventure, role-playing and simulation. ATVI’s current market cap is $38.1 billion.

    • Earnings and Sales Growth: Over the last twelve months, earnings  declined about -16%, while sales declined about -6.5%. This is a reflection of a decline in ATVI’s total user base, and increasing concentration of its revenue from its top franchises, and the fact that the gaming industry is intensely competitive. The picture did improve in the last quarter, as earnings grew 34%, although revenues continued to decline about -7%. The company’s margin profile, however is a sign of strength, since Net Income increased to 17% of Revenues in the last quarter versus 8.17% over the last year.
    • Free Cash Flow: ATVI’s free cash flow is attractive, at a little over $1.7 billion.
    • Debt to Equity: ATVI has a debt/equity ratio of .25. This number declined significantly over the last quarter, and reflects the company’s conservative approach to debt. Their balance sheet shows more than $3.3 billion in cash and liquid assets in the last quarter versus $2.6 billion in long-term debt.
    • Dividend: ATVI pays an annual dividend of $.34 per share, which isn’t very impressive given the fact that translates to an annual yield that is less than 1%. Keep in mind, however that very few software companies, much less gaming stocks pay a divided at all.
    • Price/Book Ratio: there are a lot of ways to measure how much a stock should be worth; but one of the simplest methods that I like uses the stock’s Book Value, which for ATVI is $13.97, which translates to a Price/Book ratio of 3.57 at the stock’s current price. Their historical average Price/Book ratio is 3.83, which is only about 6.7% below the stock’s current price. Their Price/Cash Flow, ratio, however is about 30% below its historical average; if you use both numbers, you get a long-term price target between $53.50 and nearly $65 per share. Given the speed and depth of the stock’s decline since October, I don’t the worst is over, but that should only serve to improve the stock’s value proposition for picky value investors like me. Given the stock’s current fundamentals, it would start to look very compelling at around $43 per share.



    Technical Profile

    Here’s a look at the stock’s latest technical chart.

     

    • Current Price Action/Trends and Pivots: ATVI’s decline really accelerated at the beginning of November, with the stock gapping down from around $64 per share to its current level around $49. That’s a decline of nearly 30% in just a couple of weeks, and it has pushed the stock not only to a new 52-week low, but also to a price level that it hasn’t seen since April of 2017. The stock’s immediate resistance is between $52.50 and $53, with support right around its recent low in the $47 range.
    • Near-term Keys: The gap that was created overnight when the stock plunged from a bit above $64 to around $55 earlier this year is interesting. If the stock can start to build some positive momentum, a push above $53 (or better, $55) creates a strong opportunity for a short-term bullish trade using call options or just buying the stock outright, with a target price at roughly half the total distance of the gap, which is between $59 and $60 per share. If, however, the stock drops below $47, it could drop all the way to $40 without much difficulty, and so that could provide an interesting shorting opportunity, or a chance to buy put options. The stock’s value proposition is interesting right now, but not quite compelling enough to prompt me to say it’s a great buy right now; but if it does break down, any kind of stabilization between $40 and $43 would be very hard to ignore.


  • 26 Nov
    HPE could be an interesting tech play for value investors

    HPE could be an interesting tech play for value investors

    Market volatility since the beginning of October has pushed the entire market down near to its 52-week low, which was last seen in April of this year. That broad-based move, which puts the S&P 500 Index back into correction territory, has put a number of sectors near or into their own bear market territory. Tech stock have been some of the biggest headline generators over the last several weeks, and by some measurements could be considered one of the most bearish sectors in the market right now. If you’re focusing on short-term trading strategies, that means that looking for bullish trades on tech stocks is probably a losing game; but if you’re willing to work with a long-term perspective, and to look for stocks that could offer an interesting value proposition, this is a sector whose current bearish momentum could also represent a smart opportunity.

    Some of the questions about the tech sector right now are significant, and I don’t think they are likely to be answered quickly. Trade tensions between the U.S. and China have kept pressure on the sector all year long, and there still doesn’t seem to an end in sight to the pall that has cast on any company with any kind of hint of exposure to that part of the world. Pricing pressures in storage technology – specifically memory and drive storage – attributed to oversupply as well as increasing competition in the segment – are another concern that seems to be having something of a ripple effect on companies that compete in the consumer and enterprise storage space. In a broader sense, some disappointing recent numbers about the latest iPhone release are leading a lot of investors to wonder if that business is recent the limits of its growth potential. Add to those sector-specific questions additional uncertainty about whether the economy’s current health is finally reaching its nadir and could start to taper off, or whether increasing interest rates are finally going to bring the longest period of economic expansion in memory to an end, and it isn’t all that surprising to see the market, and the tech sector specifically, threatening to turn into a more serious downward trend.



    What do you do as an investor to keep your money working for you when the market looks like it could be getting riskier? Some folks prefer to take a completely defensive approach, meaning that they’ll take advantage of every opportunity to close out the long positions they have, and stop taking on new ones, until they see indications that the broad market is starting to stabilize, or even beginning to pick up new bullish momentum. The advantage that approach has is that if you’re right, and the market’s current correction is going to turn into a much longer downward trend, or out right bear market, sitting in cash means that you aren’t going to lose money, while those who do decide to keep their money in the market are much more likely to see the stocks they are holding drop well below the prices they bought them at. Depending on where they got them, a truly extended bear market could mean those stocks could take years to recover back to the levels they were at they got in.

    The disadvantage, however is that sitting in cash means that you have immediately limited the possibility of future growth – at least for as long as you stay in cash. Consider that most savings accounts, CD’s or money markets are offering yields below 3% right now, and that means that the longer you sit in cash, the more you’re really allowing your buying to deteriorate. Keeping your money in the market means that you’re still giving your money a chance to work for you – because it isn’t a given that every stock in the market is going to keep going down, even when the broad is market is overwhelmingly bearish. There are always pockets of opportunity to be found, in every industry and sector of the market.

    When it comes to technology, I like the idea of looking for value in companies whose business model might not put them on the cutting edge of innovation, but does keep them in the segments that are going to keep everything else going. Enterprise technology refers to hardware, software, and technology services and solutions that drive business, and even if the broad economy falters, the truth is that technology’s place in the world’s economic fabric isn’t going away. Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co (HPE) is an example of a company that serves this specific segment, and that I think represents a smart tech play, even if the economy and the broad market turns bearish. The company has an overall solid fundamental profile, and even more importantly, a value proposition that, even with a conservative long-term price target, offers a nice opportunity right now.



    Fundamental and Value Profile

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company is a provider of technology solutions. The Company’s segments include: Enterprise Group, Software, Financial Services and Corporate Investments. The Enterprise Group segment provides its customers with the technology infrastructure they need to optimize traditional information technology (IT). The Software segment allows its customers to automate IT operations to simplify, accelerate and secure business prHPEesses and drives the analytics that turn raw data into actionable knowledge. The Financial Services segment enables flexible IT consumption models, financial architectures and customized investment solutions for its customers. The Corporate Investments segment includes Hewlett Packard Labs and certain business incubation projects, among others. HPE has a current market cap of $21.4 billion.

    • Earnings and Sales Growth: Over the past year, earnings increased almost 42%, while sales declined about 5.5%. In the last quarter, earnings increased about 2.9.5%, while sales grew by 4%. The company operates with a margin profile that declined from 10.4% in the past twelve months to 5.8% over the last quarter.
    • Free Cash Flow: HPE’s Free Cash Flow is modest, at about $440 million. On a Free Cash Flow Yield basis, that translates to a mostly unremarkable 2.05%.
    • Debt to Equity: HPE has a debt/equity ratio of .42, which is a conservative number. Their balance sheet shows $5.3 billion in cash against $9.9 billion in long-term debt. Their balance sheet indicates their operating profits are adequate to service their debt, with healthy liquidity as well.
    • Dividend: HPE pays a dividend of $.45 per share, which translates to an annual yield of about 3.09% at the stock’s current price.
    • Price/Book Ratio: there are a lot of ways to measure how much a stock should be worth; but one of the simplest methods that I like uses the stock’s Book Value, which for HPE is $15.94 per share. At HPE’s current price, that translates to a Price/Book Ratio of .91. The stock has actually only been trading publicly for about three years, which means that historical average ratios are less reliable; in this case I like to use the industry average as a reference point. The industry average Price/Book ratio is 2.7 and puts the top end of the stock’s long-term price target at around $43 per share. I think that is an extremely overoptimistic target, given that the stock’s all-time high is only at around $19 per share; however a better measurement comes using the stock’s Price/Cash flow ratio, which is currently trading about 28.5% below the industry average Price/Cash flow ratio. That translates to a more conservative, but still attractive target prices at around $18.50 per share.



    Technical Profile

    Here’s a look at the stock’s latest technical chart.

     

    • Current Price Action/Trends and Pivots: HPE’s downward slide since January is easy to see, with most of the decline seen from its March peak at $19.50 to its July low, which the stock is very near to right now. If the stock breaks below its current support level, which is right around $14.50, it should find its next support between $12.50 and $13 per share. The stock would need to break above $16, to about $16.50, to confirm a reversal of its longer downward trend.
    • Near-term Keys: If you don’t mind being aggressive, and little bit speculative, there could be an opportunity to buy the stock or work with call options if it can bounce of support around $14.50 and push higher. In that case, be ready to take profits quickly between $15.50 and $16 per share. A bearish trade using put options or shorting the stock isn’t really a very practical trade unless it does actually break below its current support to around $14. I believe the best opportunity lies in the stock’s long-term value proposition, but given the overall bearish sentiment in the broad market and the sector, I think the stock could keep dropping, which just means that its value proposition is likely be even more attractive the longer you wait for signs the stock is actually about to reverse its downward trend.


  • 14 Nov
    AAPL is down big since October – how much is it actually worth?

    AAPL is down big since October – how much is it actually worth?

    Apple Inc. (AAPL) is one of the biggest companies in the world; in August of this year, with the stock pushing nicely above $200 per share, they were the first company in the modern era to officially cross the $1 trillion dollar threshold. And over the last ten years, it is without a doubt one of the biggest performers throughout the course of the bull market. Along with its big tech brethren like Alphabet (GOOGL), Amazon (AMZN) and Microsoft (MSFT), AAPL has long been one of the companies that the rest of the market seems to have taken its cues from. More →

  • 07 Nov
    Big discount + buyout rumors = what for SYMC?

    Big discount + buyout rumors = what for SYMC?

    For most of this year, the tech sector has been one of the most profitable areas of the market to be invested. That’s not all that surprising given that the industry’s performance throughout the market’s extended upward trend since 2009 has been led by this sector. Since the beginning of October, however, this sector has also paced the market to the downside, dropping almost 14% as measured by the SPDR Select Technology ETF (XLK) through October. More →

  • 25 Oct
    Fundamental strength alone isn’t enough to make TXN a good buy right now

    Fundamental strength alone isn’t enough to make TXN a good buy right now

    The last couple of weeks have seen market volatility return in a big way, and with it fear seems to be increasing quite a bit this week. I think part of it is because investors are starting to realize how close the market is right now to an important inflection point. As of yesterday’s close, the tech-dominated NASDAQ had officially dropped more than 10% below its last all-time high, which was reached back in late August. To add insult to injury, both the Dow and the S7P 500 have given back almost all of the gains they’ve achieved since the last correction that ended in March of this year, and are now slightly lower for the entire year. More →

  • 18 Oct
    DLB is a great stock at a high price: how to play it in today’s market

    DLB is a great stock at a high price: how to play it in today’s market

    Warren Buffett is the living gold standard of value investors today; practically every different approach to determining how much a stock should be worth borrows from some element of the methods Mr. Buffett has employed in building his wealth and reputation over the course of decades. More →

  • 27 Sep
    Semiconductors are struggling, but this small-cap stock could be a Diamond in the Rough

    Semiconductors are struggling, but this small-cap stock could be a Diamond in the Rough

    The semiconductor industry has been one of the interesting segments of the Technology sector to watch for a few years now. Since 2016, the industry as measured by the iShares Semiconductor ETF (SOXX) has outpaced the rest of the broad stock market by a wide margin, increasing in value by more than 140%; by comparison, the S&P 500 increased by 60% over the same time period. Since hitting an all-time high in mid-March, however, the industry has stagnated, falling almost 8% as of this writing from that peak. More →

  • 18 Sep
    MU could be the best bargain in the stock market right now – but be careful!

    MU could be the best bargain in the stock market right now – but be careful!

    Over the last month or so, market fears and uncertainty have centered primarily around global trade. In July and August, one of the most affected pockets of the economy was the tech sector, with particular bearishness bearing down on semiconductor stocks. As measured by the iShares Semiconductor ETF (SOXX), that industry is down about 5.5% since peaking in early June. More →

  • 10 Sep
    Want to be a smart value investor? Pay attention to great stocks at deep discounts – like WDC

    Want to be a smart value investor? Pay attention to great stocks at deep discounts – like WDC

    Since mid-July, I’ve written twice previously about Western Digital Corporation (WDC). The first time I wrote about them, the stock was priced around $75 per share, and my analysis showed that was a nice price for a good company that had hit an all-time high at around $107 just a few months before. On August 9, I wrote about them again, because the stock had dropped even lower, to around $66 per share, but now also had its most recent earnings report to add to the mix. At a price that was about 12% lower than just a few weeks before, and with a terrific fundamental profile, what had been a “nice’ price for the stock was now looking like a “great” price. Fast forward a month, and as of this writing the stock is now below $58 per share. The fundamentals haven’t changed in four weeks, but in the last week or so the stock picked up some more negative momentum and is pushing to even deeper lows.

    So what’s been driving the latest plunge, which has driven the stock down a little over 23% since my first post in July? Sometimes, the stock market makes sense – or at least, you can tie what a stock is doing at a given time to specific news, or to something about the underlying company that has some semblance of logic to it. Often, though, it’s downright maddening. I’ll admit that when I first saw WDC drop below $70 I struggled to tie it to anything concrete. I’ve kept digging, and while I think I’ve found a couple of threads to tie the decline to, the logic behind one of them makes me shake my head.



    Shortly after my July post, WDC published its latest quarterly earnings report. The numbers were good across the board – every fundamental measurement I use in my analysis remained very healthy or improved, including the company’s Book Value. It was right after that report, however that the stock started to drop. At the same time, WDC’s only real competitor in the HDD space, Seagate Technology Plc (STX) released their own earnings report. STX’s report reflected a reality that seems to be scaring investors about either company, because sales of HDD storage continues to decline. In the consumer space, in particular, HDD clearly looks like a dying breed.

    The picture for NAND and SSD storage – memory that is built on solid-state technology, and what has increasingly become the preferred storage type in the consumer market, including for personal computers of just about any type, tablets, and pretty much any type of mobile device – also appears murky, and that is another element that is working against the stock’s price right now. Multiple recent reports from industry analysts indicate that pricing for NAND memory is dropping amid concerns about oversupply as well as increasing competition in the space. That puts pressure on the second tier of WDC’s business strategy; the first tier continues to provide HDD storage to the enterprise and cloud storage market (where the larger capacities available from traditional drives is needed), while the second included the 2016 acquisition of SanDisk to put them at the front of pack in the consumer-driven NAND and SSD market.



    The truth, of course is that with more companies like Micron Technology (MU), Intel Corporation (INTC) and others making forays into the space, it isn’t a given WDC will maintain their leadership position in this segment. Intensifying competition, along with high supply clearly is also playing a role right now in the stock’s decline and is a major centerpiece of every argument I’m finding against paying attention to this space right now. That is actually one of the biggest reasons that i continue to think the opportunity with the stock is even better today than it was a month ago.

    Competition in any business segment is a normal thing, and while that increases the pressure on any company, a good management team doesn’t shy away from it. I really like WDC’s strategy, and I think that in the long run they’re doing the right things to keep their business growing. I’m even willing to concede that pricing pressures in the NAND and SSD space could impact the company’s earnings in the near term; but I think the market is over-selling that risk to the point that the stock’s incredibly deep discount now – more than 46% below its March high – is making the stock an undeniable bargain. Even the analysts that are writing scary predictions right now are putting the stock’s long-term target price at around $75, which is about 30% above the stock’s current price, and not too far from my own target, as you’ll see below.



    Fundamental and Value Profile

    Western Digital Corporation (WDC) is a developer, manufacturer and provider of data storage devices and solutions that address the needs of the information technology (IT) industry and the infrastructure that enables the proliferation of data in virtually every industry. The Company’s portfolio of offerings addresses three categories: Datacenter Devices and Solutions (capacity and performance enterprise hard disk drives (HDDs), enterprise solid state drives (SSDs), datacenter software and system solutions); Client Devices (mobile, desktop, gaming and digital video hard drives, client SSDs, embedded products and wafers), and Client Solutions (removable products, hard drive content solutions and flash content solutions). The Company develops and manufactures a portion of the recording heads and magnetic media used in its hard drive products. WDC’s current market cap is $16.8 billion.

    • Earnings and Sales Growth: Over the last twelve months, earnings  grew more than 29% while revenue growth was modest, posting an increase of almost 6%. WDC operates with a narrow margin profile of about 1%. By comparison, STX’s margins are around 10%. I believe the difference is a reflection of the company’s differing approach to growth; STX focuses almost exclusively on the higher margin aspect of increasing enterprise demand, while WDC takes a two-tiered approach by meeting enterprise demand for HDD drives while also pushing hard on innovation and evolution with NAND and SSD storage.
    • Free Cash Flow: WDC’s free cash flow is very healthy, at almost $3.4 billion. That translates to a free cash flow yield of almost 17%, which is much higher than I would normally expect given the company’s narrow operating margins.
    • Debt to Equity: WDC has a debt/equity ratio of .95. That number declined from a little above 1 two quarters ago, as long-term debt dropped by more than $1 billion. Their balance sheet indicates their operating profits are more than adequate to repay their debt, and with almost $5 billion in cash and liquid reserves, the company has excellent financial flexibility, which they plan to use to pay down debt, repurchase their shares and consider other strategic acquisitions.
    • Dividend: WDC pays an annual dividend of $2.00 per share, which translates to a yield of almost 3.5% at the stock’s current price. That fat dividend – quite a bit higher than the S&P 500 average, which is a little below 2% – is a good reason to think seriously about buying the stock and waiting out any near-term price volatility you might have to endure. It’s free money you don’t have to do anything for except to hold your shares.
    • Price/Book Ratio: there are a lot of ways to measure how much a stock should be worth; but one of the simplest methods that I like uses the stock’s Book Value, which for WDC is $38.53 and translates to a Price/Book ratio of 1.45 at the stock’s current price. Their historical average Price/Book ratio is 2.12. That suggest the stock is trading right now at a discount of a little over 31%, which is very attractive, since it puts the stock’s long-term target price at nearly $84 per share.



    Technical Profile

    Here’s a look at the stock’s latest technical chart.

     

    • Current Price Action/Trends and Pivots: The red diagonal line measures the length of the stock’s intermediate downward trend, and also informs the Fibonacci trend retracement lines shown on the right side of the chart. The stock broke below strong support from repeated low pivots since late last year at $75, which has really driven the stock’s bearish momentum. The Fibonacci analysis shown on the chart above makes it hard to see where the stock’s next support level is likely to be. The stock is currently plumbing lows not seen since late 2016, where previous pivots put the most likely support in the $53 range.
    • Near-term Keys: As you can see, the stock is already offering a massively discounted price relative to where I think it’s long-term potential lies. The truth is that if you went long on this stock in late July, you’re probably trying to decide what to do to manage the position now. I think there is more than adequate argument to hold on and ride out the stock’s current downward trend; but if you want to limit your risk, using a stop loss 25% below your purchase price would be a smart, conservative approach. If you’re thinking about trying to short the stock or start working with put options to take advantage of downside, the best signal for that kind of trade would come if the stock manages to break prior pivot support at around $53. That could see the stock drive even lower and into the mid-$40 range.


  • 30 Aug
    SYMC looks like a value trap!

    SYMC looks like a value trap!

    The market looks like it’s trying to reclaim the long, extended upward run it’s been following since late 2009. This week, following the announcement of a new trade deal between the United States and Mexico, the market finally broke above the all-time high it set in January of this year before dropping back a little over 10%. More →

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